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PEN DUICK

 



Pen Duick was a boat that helped Éric Tabarly achieve worldwide recognition as a renowned yacht man.  On this boat he started learning to sail at the age of seven.  It was also the last boat he saw.

The 36-ft Pen Duick was designed by William Fife III and built in 1898 by Gridiron & Marine Motor Works at Carrigaloe in Cork Harbour, Ireland for Cork yachtsman W. J. C. Cummins. The gaff-rigged cutter was quickly noted as a successful racer in Irish, British and French waters. Éric Tabarly's father acquired her in 1938.  After WW II, Éric convinced his father in giving her to him instead of selling it.  Years later, Eric was told her wooden hull was rotten. He proceeded to save her himself, making a mold to build her a new polyester hull which was the largest of its kind at the time.  He refitted her entirely, with a loftier rig for the southern climes.

In 1962, Tabarly raced in the Single-Handed Trans-Atlantic Race on Pen Duick.  Determined to win the next edition, Tabarly started building the Margilic V, and in autumn 1963, the Pen Duick II.

In 1964, twenty six years after his father acquired the Pen Duick on which he let him practice sailing, Tabarly  won the Single-Handed Trans-Atlantic Race with the Pen Duick II.  This achievement earned Tabarly instant fame and the rank of Chevalier de la Légion d'honneur.  He received the Blue Water Medal for his victory.

In 1967, Tabarly won the Channel Race, Round Gotland Race, and Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race on Pen Duick III which was built in aluminum with a distinguished clipper bow.
In 1971, he won the Falmouth-Gibraltar and the Middle Sea Race, and the next, the Transpac.

In 1980, Tabarly sailed Paul Ricard for a transatlantic race, beating Charlie Barr's transatlantic record.

In 1997, Tabarly won the Fastnet Race on Aquitaine Innovations.

In May 1998, celebrations were held in Bénodet for the centenary of Pen Duick.  In June, she sailed to Scotland, but while in transit in the Irish Sea, the night of 12 to 13 June, a spar threw Tabarly overboard and he drowned.  His body was recovered by the trawler An Yvidig on 20 July.

Éric Tabarly's Pen Duick IV is still active in today’s classic events.



36" long x 16" tall x 8.5" w (including the base's dimensions)
  $4,500   S & H is $90