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BELLE  POULE model ship

The Belle Poule was a 60-gun frigate of the French Navy, famous for bringing the remains of Napoléon from Saint Helena back to France.  On July 27th 1840, she was painted black and set sail for Saint Helena.  On 8 December,  the Emperor's remains were transferred to the steamship Normandie in Cherbourg for further transport to Paris.

The Belle Poule was launched in 1834.  She was the first ships to be built in a covered shipyard. Design inspired by the USS Constitution, the Belle-Poule displayed very good sailing properties.  The word belle is "beautiful", while poule is a reference to her name--Paule, but also means "chick", which in French, as it was later adopted in English, can refer to a young girl.

 
BELLE POULE BELLE POULE model BELLE POULE napoleon remains BELLE POULE napoleon
BELLE POULE french ship BELLE POULE model ship BELLE POULE ship model

  
 

 

Like all tall ship model ships, this Belle Poule model features:

  • Scratch-built

  • Double plank-on-frame

  • All parts are wooden or metal

  • Guns: Metal barrels on wooden carriages that sit on real deck

  • Copper-plated bottom

39" long x 31" tall x 12" wide   $2,100    S&H is $150. 

Add 110v light feature:  $200    (110 v.  Cord can be unplugged from base for displaying without light)
 

For display case, please click here: Model Ship Display Case

And please click on the blue wordings to check out our beautiful Bucentaure model, HMS Victory model, as well as Belle Poule model that brought emperor Napoleon's remains back to France in 1840.